Analysis of John Galt’s speech: Individuality

Atlas Shrugged, 1957, by Ayn Rand One of the themes of Atlas Shrugged, and of the Objectivist philosophy of Ayn Rand is the idea of all rights are individual rights. Growing up in the Soviet Union, she witnessed first-hand the evils of collectivism, the negation of the self. She believed in the rights of minorities, … Continue reading Analysis of John Galt’s speech: Individuality

Analysis of John Galt’s speech: Sacrifice

One of the chief themes of Galt's speech is the idea that society had begun to hold sacrifice as its highest virtue, but Galt points out that in society's twisted morality, societies concept of sacrifice was not that of noble self-sacrifice, it was responding to the demands of others that was held as a virtue. Virtue, in this fallen system, was to accede to the demands of others, even to the point of going against one's own best self-interest.

LR Podcast S3E2: Holes in the Mules?

One of the more ridiculous 'holes' claimed is that people started wearing gloves when they dropped off ballots, not to keep their fingerprints off the ballots or drop boxes, but to keep their hands warm.  Do most people you know wear surgical gloves to keep their hands warm?

LR Podcast S2E9: You be the judge.

We've all heard someone ask:  “Who are you to judge me?” or some variant of that question.  It's a defensive question usually asked by someone who reasonably expects to be judges harshly by their peers for some ethical or moral transgression. It's safe to say that someone secure in the notion that society or their peers would judge their actions favorably, is not going to pose this rhetorical question. A good retort to that question might be:  “Who are you that you are above judgment?”

Ayn Rand on the Rights of Man

When we base rights on what is good for society, that begs the question: Who speaks for society? Throughout history, such people who claim to speak for society inevitably turn out to be tyrants. You have a few, even a single person, deciding what is good for the people. Rand thought that people ought to decide for themselves, based upon rational self-interest.

LR Podcast S2E8: Right on, Rand!

Ayn Rand saw collectivism in all its forms as an impediment to human rights. "The good of society" cannot be the basis of rights, since society is merely a collection of individuals, and so the only proper rights are individual rights.  When we base rights on what is good for society, that begs the question:  Who speaks for society?  Throughout history, such people who claim to speak for society inevitably turn out to be tyrants. You have a few, even a single person, deciding what is good for the people.  Rand thought that people ought to decide for themselves, based upon rational self-interest.

Ayn Rand had CRT pegged over 50 years ago.

Racism, as a collectivist pursuit, was anathema to her strictly individualistic Objectivism. To her, all forms of collectivism be they socialism, fascism, or racism were immoral on the basis that collectivism on the national level, ultimately and inevitably leads to authoritarianism and the trampling of individual rights by the government. Racism therefore, would necessitate that same authoritarian brand of government that all other forms of collectivism required in order to sustain itself on a national level.

My Initial Reaction to The Communist Manifesto

  I at long last, have bought and read a copy of The Communist Manifesto, by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. Before now, I had only read quotes and brief excerpts from it. I was acquainted with it through commentary on it, but I knew once Democrats started to openly profess their socialist leanings I'd have … Continue reading My Initial Reaction to The Communist Manifesto